thekazzu

quasi-normalcy:

kaehzar:

bearheartreplica:

mechamaestro:

HEY, CANADIAN TUMBLR

YOU ALL NEED TO FUCKING SIGN THIS.

HELL, THOSE OF YOU YOU AREN’T CANADIAN, FUCKING DO IT ANYWAY.

FOR THOSE OF YOU NOT INFORMED, HARPER LITERALLY JUST SOLD CANADA TO CHINA. 

THEY HAVE THE RIGHT TO OVERTURN FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL LAWS THAT WOULD STOP THEM FROM DOING SHIT LIKE FRACKING, EVEN IF IT’S ON NATIVE LAND.

SERIOUSLY YOU NEED TO SIGN THIS.

for more information:

x x x x

The NDP issued a statement saying “the agreement will give China’s state-controlled companies the same protection under the law as private Canadian companies.

"In effect, it will give China access to, and control over, some of Canada’s natural resources for the next 31 years."

NDP trade critic Don Davies put forward a motion in the House of Commons in April 22, 2013, calling on the government not to ratify the agreement. The motion was defeated.

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May in a statement on Wednesday said the FIPA with China was a “sell out.”

Deputy Green Party Leader Bruce Hyer added cabinet is, “signing of this deal behind closed doors, instead of giving Parliament a say, is not just undemocratic in itself … it is also a profound attack of Canada’s sovereignty as a nation, and an erosion of the rights of all Canadians to make democratic decisions about our economy, environment, and energy.”

Source: CBC

Okay, this only has 440 notes, whereas it should be having fucking street demonstrations. Sign it.

Sheep’s Clothing by TeknicolorTiger
Practice for some of my upcoming big paintings. I haven’t done any full paintings in over two years so I needed something to make me feel less hamfisted. But I had so many other issues aside from the actual painting with this damn thing. I’m glad it’s done.
My werewolf character, Vance Hayden, changing back from some blatant werewolfery.

Sheep’s Clothing by TeknicolorTiger

Practice for some of my upcoming big paintings. I haven’t done any full paintings in over two years so I needed something to make me feel less hamfisted. But I had so many other issues aside from the actual painting with this damn thing. I’m glad it’s done.

My werewolf character, Vance Hayden, changing back from some blatant werewolfery.

arless-rosencrantz

sketchinetch:

cremebuns:

emeralddragoness:

cremebuns:

A man just walked past me and said “excuse me, but you look very nice tonight darlin” I said thank you and he said you’re welcome and walked off. And that is how you compliment a woman without harassing them

No, that is still unsolicited, and thus, harassment. No amount of “darlins” is gonna make me not want to punch your ass for coming on to me without provocation.

GOD

SHUT UP

UR SO STUPID

image

[x]

viergacht
weirdletter:

Unnatural Reproductions and Monstrosity: The Birth of the Monster in Literature, Film, and Media, edited by Andrea Wood and Brandy Schillace, Cambria Press, 2014. Cover art by Johann Heinrich Füssli, info and preview: cambriapress.com.
'Monsters continue to fascinate—as well as to plague and haunt imaginations. The psychic landscape is peopled with them; the social fabric is woven of them. This persistent, paradoxical repulsion and fascination with monsters and the monstrous begins, however, with causation. With the “birth” of each new monster comes a particular anxiety about its ability to self-replicate, generally through perceived “unnatural” means. The cultural imaginary remains obsessed with the origins and genesis of monsters. From whence do monsters come? How are they created—and more importantly—what is their reproductive potential? Ironically, the very cultural and unconscious fears and anxieties about “unnatural” reproduction and monstrous progeny give birth to texts that perpetuate the creation and replication of monsters. The link between the monstrous and fears of reproduction are present from early modern narratives through nineteenth-century fears of degeneration, and into contemporary fascination with apocalyptic zombie films and science fiction narratives about genetic engineering, viral pandemics, and trans-species generation. While the incarnation of the monster manifests through different vehicles across these periods and texts, it is clear that, regardless of its form, anxiety is rooted in concerns over its fecundity—its ability to infect, to absorb, to replicate. Much has been written about gender and the monstrous, but sustained engagement with textual manifestations of cultural and unconscious fears and anxieties about “unnatural” reproduction has been limited. This book expands the current discourse on the monstrous reproductive potential of bodies—as well as minds—from a more interdisciplinary and transhistorical framework. While scholarly interest in monsters and the monstrous is certainly not new, studies on monstrous reproduction and birth have tended to be either discipline or period specific, and many are now dated. Drawing from diverse interdisciplinary perspectives in film and media studies, literary studies, history, medicine and women’s and gender studies, Unnatural Reproductions and Monstrosity builds upon pre-existing work while engaging more directly with monstrous progeny, as well as with unnatural reproduction(s), which threaten to eclipse the future, cast uncertainty on the present, and reimagine the past. Ultimately, then, the primary contribution of this book lies not only with its extensive treatment of reproductive monstrosity and unnatural parturition, but with the breadth and intriguing continuity that only a wide lens can provide. This book does not attempt to provide a complete historical assessment or catalog of the enduring cultural fascination with the reproductive origins and potential of monsters. Rather, it provides diverse interdisciplinary and transhistorical perspectives with single unifying theme of unnatural reproduction(s), which is unique to the collection, remaining central to the concept of monstrosity and its evolving narrative incarnations. This interdisciplinary collection spanning the areas of history, literature, medical humanities, and film and media studies explores the transhistorical textual fascination with reproductive monstrosity and unnatural parturition. The collection’s four sections provide perspective on hyperbolic and monstrous representations of reproduction and birth that speak to anxieties and fears about gender and sexuality, codified through “unnatural” manifestations and their progeny. By focusing not only on the effect of the monstrous, but also on its reproduction in a variety of genres and modes from science to cinema, the essays in this collection offer critical insight into enduring questions about the genesis of monsters and their reproductive potential that have long haunted the world and continue to shape many fears about the future. This book analyzes how fears about unnatural reproduction and monstrous offspring—and their frequent connections to the feminine—have proliferated and propagated across the very texts which are repetitively created and consumed.'
Contents: Introduction Our Monstrous Ways — Brandy Schillace and Andrea Wood I. Theorizing Monstrous Genesis: Past, Present, and Future Chapter 1. Renaissance Demons and Posthuman Cyborgs: Ambroise Paré’s On Monsters and Marvels and Donna Haraway’s “Cyborg Manifesto” — Alistair Brown Chapter 2. The Devil Made Me Do It: Sin, (Inner) Demons, and Monstrous Reproduction in Milton’s Paradise Lost — Joanna Shearer Chapter 3. Constructing the Vampire: Spirit Agency in the Construction of the Vampire in the Anonymous Acten-mabige und Umstansliche Relation von denen Vampiren oder Menschen-Saugern (1732) — Michael Pickering Chapter 4. Monsters that Matter: The Monstrous Birth and Other Things that Rise in the Contemporary Zombie Film — Jesse Stommel II. Repetition and Replication: Unnatural Reproduction(s) Chapter 5. Monstrosity, Monument and Multiplication: ‘The Lamenting Lady’ Margaret of Henneberg (and her 365 Children) in Early Modern England — Lindsay Ann Reid) Chapter 6. Death, Disease and Discontent: The Monstrous Reign of the Super-virus — Emilie Taylor-Brown Chapter 7. Serial Death and the Zombie: The Networked Necronomics of Left 4 Dead — Stephanie Boluk III. Dangerous Maternity and Monstrous Mothers Chapter 8. Mothering Monsters: Avoidances, Intervention and Response to Freakery in Progressive America — K.A. Woytonik Chapter 9. Hypersaurus Rex: Recombinant Reality in Jurassic Park — Randy Laist Chapter 10. Monstrous Mothers and the Ultimate Sacrifice: Vampiric Pregnancies in Angeland Breaking Dawn — Dani Lawson IV. Innocence Lost: Monstrous Children Chapter 11. ‘Children of the Night’: Dracula, Degeneration and Syphilitic Births at fin de siècle — Brandy Schillace Chapter 12. Monstrous Births and Monstrous Children in the Late Nineteenth Century — Alison Crockford Chapter 13. Gender, Genetic Engineering, and Ethics: Transhumanism in Splice and Hanna — April Miller Chapter 14. Failed Futurity: Reproductive Anxieties, Undead Children, and Queering Survival in Apocalyptic Zombie Films — Andrea Wood References Index

*adds to wishlist*

weirdletter:

Unnatural Reproductions and Monstrosity: The Birth of the Monster in Literature, Film, and Media, edited by Andrea Wood and Brandy Schillace, Cambria Press, 2014. Cover art by Johann Heinrich Füssli, info and preview: cambriapress.com.

'Monsters continue to fascinate—as well as to plague and haunt imaginations. The psychic landscape is peopled with them; the social fabric is woven of them. This persistent, paradoxical repulsion and fascination with monsters and the monstrous begins, however, with causation. With the “birth” of each new monster comes a particular anxiety about its ability to self-replicate, generally through perceived “unnatural” means. The cultural imaginary remains obsessed with the origins and genesis of monsters. From whence do monsters come? How are they created—and more importantly—what is their reproductive potential? Ironically, the very cultural and unconscious fears and anxieties about “unnatural” reproduction and monstrous progeny give birth to texts that perpetuate the creation and replication of monsters. The link between the monstrous and fears of reproduction are present from early modern narratives through nineteenth-century fears of degeneration, and into contemporary fascination with apocalyptic zombie films and science fiction narratives about genetic engineering, viral pandemics, and trans-species generation. While the incarnation of the monster manifests through different vehicles across these periods and texts, it is clear that, regardless of its form, anxiety is rooted in concerns over its fecundity—its ability to infect, to absorb, to replicate. Much has been written about gender and the monstrous, but sustained engagement with textual manifestations of cultural and unconscious fears and anxieties about “unnatural” reproduction has been limited. This book expands the current discourse on the monstrous reproductive potential of bodies—as well as minds—from a more interdisciplinary and transhistorical framework. While scholarly interest in monsters and the monstrous is certainly not new, studies on monstrous reproduction and birth have tended to be either discipline or period specific, and many are now dated. Drawing from diverse interdisciplinary perspectives in film and media studies, literary studies, history, medicine and women’s and gender studies, Unnatural Reproductions and Monstrosity builds upon pre-existing work while engaging more directly with monstrous progeny, as well as with unnatural reproduction(s), which threaten to eclipse the future, cast uncertainty on the present, and reimagine the past. Ultimately, then, the primary contribution of this book lies not only with its extensive treatment of reproductive monstrosity and unnatural parturition, but with the breadth and intriguing continuity that only a wide lens can provide. This book does not attempt to provide a complete historical assessment or catalog of the enduring cultural fascination with the reproductive origins and potential of monsters. Rather, it provides diverse interdisciplinary and transhistorical perspectives with single unifying theme of unnatural reproduction(s), which is unique to the collection, remaining central to the concept of monstrosity and its evolving narrative incarnations. This interdisciplinary collection spanning the areas of history, literature, medical humanities, and film and media studies explores the transhistorical textual fascination with reproductive monstrosity and unnatural parturition. The collection’s four sections provide perspective on hyperbolic and monstrous representations of reproduction and birth that speak to anxieties and fears about gender and sexuality, codified through “unnatural” manifestations and their progeny. By focusing not only on the effect of the monstrous, but also on its reproduction in a variety of genres and modes from science to cinema, the essays in this collection offer critical insight into enduring questions about the genesis of monsters and their reproductive potential that have long haunted the world and continue to shape many fears about the future. This book analyzes how fears about unnatural reproduction and monstrous offspring—and their frequent connections to the feminine—have proliferated and propagated across the very texts which are repetitively created and consumed.'

Contents:
Introduction Our Monstrous Ways — Brandy Schillace and Andrea Wood
I. Theorizing Monstrous Genesis: Past, Present, and Future
Chapter 1. Renaissance Demons and Posthuman Cyborgs: Ambroise Paré’s On Monsters and Marvels and Donna Haraway’s “Cyborg Manifesto” — Alistair Brown
Chapter 2. The Devil Made Me Do It: Sin, (Inner) Demons, and Monstrous Reproduction in Milton’s Paradise Lost — Joanna Shearer
Chapter 3. Constructing the Vampire: Spirit Agency in the Construction of the Vampire in the Anonymous Acten-mabige und Umstansliche Relation von denen Vampiren oder Menschen-Saugern (1732) — Michael Pickering
Chapter 4. Monsters that Matter: The Monstrous Birth and Other Things that Rise in the Contemporary Zombie Film — Jesse Stommel
II. Repetition and Replication: Unnatural Reproduction(s)
Chapter 5. Monstrosity, Monument and Multiplication: ‘The Lamenting Lady’ Margaret of Henneberg (and her 365 Children) in Early Modern England — Lindsay Ann Reid)
Chapter 6. Death, Disease and Discontent: The Monstrous Reign of the Super-virus — Emilie Taylor-Brown
Chapter 7. Serial Death and the Zombie: The Networked Necronomics of Left 4 Dead — Stephanie Boluk
III. Dangerous Maternity and Monstrous Mothers
Chapter 8. Mothering Monsters: Avoidances, Intervention and Response to Freakery in Progressive America — K.A. Woytonik
Chapter 9. Hypersaurus Rex: Recombinant Reality in Jurassic Park — Randy Laist
Chapter 10. Monstrous Mothers and the Ultimate Sacrifice: Vampiric Pregnancies in Angeland Breaking Dawn — Dani Lawson
IV. Innocence Lost: Monstrous Children
Chapter 11. ‘Children of the Night’: Dracula, Degeneration and Syphilitic Births at fin de siècle — Brandy Schillace
Chapter 12. Monstrous Births and Monstrous Children in the Late Nineteenth Century — Alison Crockford
Chapter 13. Gender, Genetic Engineering, and Ethics: Transhumanism in Splice and Hanna — April Miller
Chapter 14. Failed Futurity: Reproductive Anxieties, Undead Children, and Queering Survival in Apocalyptic Zombie Films — Andrea Wood
References
Index

*adds to wishlist*